Chess Archaeology HomeChess is a scientific game and its literature ought to be placed on the basis of the strictest truthfulness, which is the foundation of all scientific research.W. Steinitz

Upper row (from left to right): Wilhelm Steinitz, Mikhail Chigorin, and the game between Steinitz and Joseph H. Blackburne. Second row: Samuel Tinsley (left) against Harry N. Pillsbury (the position on the board is after White's 24th move), and lookers-on.  Which game is pictured at the right is unknown.

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Americans Are Evening Players

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The picture above was drawn on June 16, 1899. The scene of action was the thirteenth round of the London International Tournament at St. Stephen’s Hall, Royal Aquarium, Westminster. The competitors in this meeting were (in alphabetic order): Henry E. Bird, Joseph H. Blackburne, Mikhail Chigorin, Wilhelm Cohn, Dawid Janowsky, Emanuel Lasker, Francis J. Lee, Géza Maróczy, James Mason, Harry N. Pillsbury, Carl Schlechter, Jackson W. Showalter, Wilhelm Steinitz, Richard Teichmann, and Samuel Tinsley.

Six games were played in the thirteenth round, of which four were decided in the afternoon and two in the evening. The affair between the two players at the front, Pillsbury and Tinsley, and the other game depicted, between Blackburne and Steinitz, came to a conclusion in the afternoon. So did the contests between Janowsky and Bird, and Maróczy and Chigorin. The games Lee against Schlechter and Showalter against Cohn were decided in the second sitting.

The playing hours of the tournament were from 12.00 p.m. to 4.30 p.m., and from 6.30 p.m. to 10.30 p.m.1 The time limit was fifteen moves per hour, and the contestants had to play five days a week. One day per week was reserved for playing out adjourned games. The tournament lasted 42 days: it took place from May 30 till July 10.

Leopold Hoffer wrote about the circumstances of the tournament:2

We have hardly witnessed a tournament in all our experience in which the players have had such an easy time of it. The games being finished every day, they have two clear days for rest weekly; they also have almost the whole evening to themselves, as the games are generally concluded at an early hour, with the exception of one or two which may last till 9.30, or the utmost ten o’clock.

Hoffer's statement that four to five games out of six were concluded within four and a half hours, raises the question: is this really true? Isn't this very fast? In regard to play on June 16 he was right. Only two games were continued in the evening that day, but what about the other days?  And were no games adjourned and  finished every day?

The tournament book, the leading English chess columns (The Field, The Illustrated London News, The Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, The Penny Illustrated Paper and Illustrated Times, The Westminster Budget, etc.) and the only chess magazine at that time (The British Chess Magazine) did not give decisive answers to these questions. In fact, they offered hardly details on these subjects.

The author has therefore tried to reconstruct the play in the tournament with the help of the reports in the daily newspapers The Daily News, The Morning Post, The Standard, and The Times (May 31 – July 11).

The daily reports show actually that four games were adjourned at the end of the evening sittings. Three of them were drawn without further playing (round 1: Teichmann - Blackburne; round 2: Pillsbury – Teichmann; round 28: Janowsky – Lasker), and one was played out on a bye day (round 25: Mason – Cohn).

If we take in account that Hoffer’s opinion was published in the paper of July 1, and that the adjourned game between Cohn and Mason still had to be contested then, one could - more or less - say that Hoffer was right on this point.

However, the daily reports also demonstrate that at least 98 games of the 186 actually played3 in the double round tournament were continued in the evening. The number could easily be higher, as it is not sure whether eight games were finished in the first or second sitting (a full list with particulars can be found below). The average number of games that were continued in the evening was – at the very least – 3.6 games, which is considerably more than the one or two Hoffer suggested.  

James Mason, Harry N. Pillsbury

The champion of evening play was Mason: he continued his game twenty times (of 26 contested in the tournament) in the evening. Mason was followed by two other Americans. Showalter finished nineteen of his 26 games in the second sitting, and Pillsbury, who played 27 games in the tournament, also made an appearance at nineteen evenings.

To shed some light on the opposite extremes: Tinsley finished most games in the first sitting: most likely twenty out of 27 (whether one of his games was terminated in the afternoon or in the evening is not clear). At least sixteen of Bird’s games were concluded in the first sitting (at which time three of his 26 games were completed is shrouded in mist); and Steinitz ended most likely fifteen of his 26 games in the afternoon (the termination time of one of his games is missing).  

Perhaps age had a role in this. The two sexagenarians, Bird and Steinitz, were the oldest contestants in London. Tinsley was in his fifties.

Mason was not only the champion of evening play, he also made the most moves in the tournament, Pillsbury again being close on his heels. The average number of moves played by each competitor per game was:4

Mason

50.1

 

Maróczy

43.1

Pillsbury

49.4

 

Teichmann

43.0

Janowsky

48.7

 

Tinsley

41.6

Bird

46.5

 

Lasker

41.3

Showalter

46.5

 

Chigorin

40.1

Blackburne

46.0

 

Steinitz

39.5

Cohn

45.3

 

Schlechter

38.6

Lee

44.6

 

Average

44.3

Bird and Tinsley had the reputation of being fast players. Their averages (in relation to the few instances that they had to continue their games in the second sittings) produce evidence for this claim.

The youngest player in the tournament made the fewest moves, while one of the senior competitors had the highest mean of moves. This seems somewhat remarkable, since it is generally assumed that young players have more fighting spirit and stamina then their older opponents.

Perhaps, for the same reason, it might be called special that Blackburne and Chigorin, both of an advanced age at the time of the London tournament, played the longest game. The Russian player won after 83 moves. Chigorin had also a role in the shortest game of the tournament: Schlechter was beaten by him in seventeen moves.

The following is the list of players by seniority: Bird (born July 14, 1830), Steinitz (May 14, 1836), Blackburne (December 10, 1841), Tinsley (January 13, 1847), Mason (November 19, 1849), Chigorin (November 12, 1850), Lee (1857), Cohn (February 6, 1859), Showalter (February 5, 1860), Janowsky (June 7, 1868), Lasker (December 24, 1868), Teichmann (December 24, 1868), Maróczy (March 3, 1870), Pillsbury (December 5, 1872), and Schlechter (March 2, 1874).5  

Janowsky celebrated his birthday during the London tournament. Whether it was a happy day is doubtful: he lost his game against Tinsley on his anniversary.

Back to the picture: the average of moves per game was 33 on June 16, a number far below the average of the whole tournament. The thirteenth round had several games of extremely short duration. The two games depicted were among the shortest of the day: Pillsbury against Tinsley extended as far as 26 moves, and the confrontation between Steinitz and Blackburne came to an end after 31 moves. The meeting between Janowsky and Bird, taking 24 moves, was another brief affair.

The two games that were sketched:

Harry N. Pillsbury  Samuel Tinsley

  • London International Tournament, Round 13

  • London, June 16, 1899

  • B00 Uncommon King's Pawn Opening

1. d4 e6 2. e4 b6

It is difficult to understand why Tinsley should persistently disregard the regular opening moves, seeing that masters like Lasker, Pillsbury, Janowsky, and others adopt them. Here after White's 2. e4 he has the French Defense. Why not continue the defense on lines proved to be sound and sufficient, instead of playing the weak Fianchetto Defense.

3. Bd3 Bb7 4. Ne2 Nf6 5. Nd2 d6 6. 0–0 Nbd7 7. f4 c5 8. c3 g6

Black seems to be fond of playing his bishops to positions of safety.

9. Ng3 h5

Weak again. Bg7 and castles would be better.

10. f5 h4 11. fxe6

Breaking up Black's game at once.

11. ... hxg3 12. exd7+ Kxd7 13. h3 cxd4 14. cxd4 Qe7 15. Qf3 Bg7 16. d5 Qe5 17. Nb3 Raf8

Defending the bishop's pawn in order to release the knight.

18. Bf4 Qxb2  

It is quite clear that Black cannot withstand the attack, and the game might be left here, except for Pillsbury's vigorous and elegant termination.

19. Bb5+ Kc8 20. Bxd6 Nxd5 21. Rac1+

If 21. exd5 Bd4+ 22. Nxd4 Qxd4+ 23. Kh1 Rxh3+ 24 .gxh3 Bxd5, winning the queen, and getting at least a draw.

21. ... Kd8 22. Qxg3 Bd4+ 23. Nxd4 Qxd4+ 24. Rf2 Nf6 25. Be5 Nxe4 26. Bf6+

Resigns.

Source: The Book of the International London Chess Congress 1899 (1900), page 163 (notes by Leopold Hoffer)

Wilhelm Steinitz  Joseph H. Blackburne

  • London International Tournament, Round 13

  • London, June 16, 1899

  • D20 Queen's Gambit Accepted

1. d4 d5 2. c4 dxc4 3. e4

Nf3, preventing Black's e5, is the proper course, as Mr. Steinitz must surely have known.

3. ... e5 4. d5 Nf6 5. Nc3 Bc5 6. Bxc4

As this pawn could not be defended, there was no need to take it at once, and it would have been better to provide against the coming attack by h3 or Bg5.

6. ... Ng4 7. Nh3 f5 8. Bg5 Qd6 9. exf5

It was necessary to take the pawn, for if 9. f3, then Ne3; and if 9 0–0, then f4, and White will lose his queen's bishop.

9. ... Bxf5 10. 0–0 Qg6 11. Nb5 Bd6 12. Bh4 h6 13. Rc1 Nd7 14. Qe2 0–0

Pawn to a6 was good enough, but this is a finer conception, as he intended to give up the exchange for the attack.

15. Nxc7 Nb6 16. Nxa8 Rxa8

And here, again, Nxc4 would have satisfied most players, but not Mr. Blackburne, even though he now loses two moves with his knight.

17. Rfd1 Nd7 18. Bg3 Ndf6 19. Bd3

White naturally seeks an exchange of pieces, but this only loses time and does not accomplish it; he would, perhaps, have done better to play Kh1, threatening f3.

19. ... e4 20. Bb1

If 20. Bxd6 exd3 21. Qf1 Be5, with a powerful attack.

20. ... Nh5 21. Qb5

An incomprehensible move, putting his queen out of play, and allowing his skilful opponent to initiate a winning attack. 21. Bxd6 Qxd6 22. g3 appears to be a feasible if not quite satisfactory defense.

21. ... Nxh2  

22. Bxh2

If Bxd6, then Bxh3 would be equally fatal.

22. ... Bxh3 23. Qf1 Bxh2+ 24. Kxh2 Bg4 25. Rd4 Nf6 26. d6

Re1, or Qh1, would even now, perhaps have saved the game.

26. ... Qh5+ 27. Kg1 Be2 28. d7

For if Qe1, Ng4 wins at once.

28. ... Ng4 29. d8Q+ Rxd8 30. Rxd8+ Kf7 31. Rd7+ Ke6

Resigns.

Sources: The Westminster Budget, June 23, 1899; Penny Illustrated Paper, June 24, 1899; The Field , June 24, 1899; The British Chess Magazine, July 1899, pages 307-308 (notes by Charles E. Ranken).  

The games in the 1899 tournament commenced exactly at 12.00 p.m. every day, with the exception of May 30, and July 10. The delay on the first day of play was half an hour and caused by the opening ceremony.6 Play opened late on the final playing day because the contestants had to be photographed.7 

Not all players are on the picture that was taken that day: Mason, Pillsbury, Showalter and Steinitz are missing. Pillsbury and Showalter had byes on July 10, which possibly explains their absence.  Why Mason and Steinitz were absent, is a mystery.

Standing (from left to right): Dawid Janowsky, Géza Maróczy, Francis J. Lee, Junius L. Cope, J. Walter Russell, Samuel Tinsley, Herbert W. Trenchard, and Wilhelm Cohn. Sitting: Henry E. Bird, Emanuel Lasker, Mikhail Chigorin, Joseph H. Blackburne, and Carl Schlechter.

Three of the men included in the photograph were not competitors in the tournament:  Junius L. Cope, J. Walter Russell and Herbert W. Trenchard. The last named was the Honorary Treasurer of the tournament. The other two were the Honorary Secretaries, Cope representing the British Chess Club and Russell the City of London Chess Club. The two London societies played an important role in organizing the gathering.8

The distribution of the prizes was on July 11 at St. Stephen’s Hall, a formality that commenced on 6.30 p.m. The prize winners were Lasker (first, £250), Janowsky, Maróczy and Pillsbury (tied for second, third and fourth prizes, each winning £165), Schlechter (fifth, £65), Blackburne (sixth,  £50), Chigorin (seventh, £40), Showalter (eighth,£30), and Mason (ninth, £20).  

Afterwards Lasker played 24 games simultaneous, and a consultation game was arranged between Chigorin and Janowsky on one side (White) and Cohn and Pillsbury on the other (Black). At 10.25 p.m., in less than three hours,  Lasker concluded his task, winning nineteen games, drawing two and losing three.9 Some of his opponents were ladies. No games of this exhibition have been found.

The consultation game was not finished when time was called (10.30 p.m.). The contest had to be carried on at the British Chess Club.10 The game went as follows:

Mikhail Chigorin & Dawid Janowsky  Wilhelm Cohn & Harry N. Pillsbury

  • London International Tournament, Offhand

  • London, July 11, 1899

  • C49 Four Knights' Game

1. e4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. Bb5 Bb4 5. 0–0 0–0 6. d3 d6 7. Bg5 Bxc3 8. bxc3 Ne7 9. Re1 Ng6 10. d4 h6 11. Bc1 c6 12. Bf1 Re8 13. c4 Bg4 14. d5 c5 15. Rb1 b6 16. h3 Bd7 17. Nh2 Nf4 18. Rb3 g5 19. g3 Ng6 20. Ng4 Kh7 21. Bg2 Ng8 22. Ne3 N8e7 23. Kh2 f5 24. exf5 Nxf5 25. Be4 Nd4 26. Rd3 Rf8 27. Rf1 Qe7 28. c3 Nf5 29. Qh5 Qe8 30. Rg1 Nxe3 31. Bxe3 Bf5 

32. f3 Bxe4 33. fxe4 Qa4 34. Qe2 Qxc4 35. Bc1 Rf7 36. Rg2 Raf8 37. h4 Rf1 38. Bd2 Qxa2 39. h5 Qb1 40. Kh3 Rh1+ 41. Kg4 Qb5 42. Rf3 Qd7+ 43. Rf5 Ne7 44. Qf2 Qc8

Resigns.

Sources: The Westminster Budget , July 21, 1899; Manchester Weekly Times, July 21, 1899; Bristol Mercury and Daily Post, July 29, 1899.

The total prize money in the master's tournament was £800. The remaining players received consolation money: Cohn £8, Bird £5, Lee £5, and Tinsley £4.11 It seems that no consolation money was distributed to Steinitz. He is not mentioned in the tournament book. 

A single round tournament was held together with the double round joust. The  prizes in this gathering, which was won by Frank Marshall,  mounted up to £200. 

Some other examples of expenditure were: the organizers of the tournament paid a total sum of £14 14s. to Lasker, Chigorin, Janowsky, Cohn and Pillsbury for their exhibition play. The rental of tables, chairs and clocks costed £22 4s. The costs of a banquet, which took place at Café Monico on June 29, were £38 9s. Again, Mason and Steinitz were not present at this meeting. Other players missing that evening were Blackburne, Janowsky and Tinsley.12

The total funds of the London tournament amounted to slightly more than £1,356. Lovers of the chess game subscribed the lion's share, approximately £1,235. The players had to pay entrance fees, a total of nearly £26. Other sources of income were the gate money and the sales of season tickets, together bringing in £24 6s.

Notable is the £70 that the organizing committee received from newspapers for the right to publish games. The Illustrated London News printed no games of the tournament, and condemned the required payment for publishing games: "A demand so exorbitant, not to say preposterous, has never been advanced before in any chess competiton."13 The writer continued:

Had the necessary fund not been subscribed by the public there might be some excuse for this method of obtaining more, but the generous response made to the committee’s appeal should have removed all need for a step without precedent in English chess. We do not profess to be lawyers, but we have yet to learn that a spectator reproducing a game from memory is guilty of any breach of copyright.

Below is the full list with the particulars of the tournament: 

 

 

Moves

First Sitting

Second Sitting

 

Round 1 (May 30)

 

 

 

 

 

Lasker – Steinitz

½-½

25

 

 

Blackburne – Teichmann

½-½

50

Adjourned

Mason – Maróczy

0-1

52

 

Chigorin – Pillsbury

0-1

47

 

Tinsley – Janowsky

0-1

59

 

 

Bird – Showalter

0-1

45

 

Cohn – Schlechter

1-0

32

 

 

Round 2 (May 31)

 

 

 

 

 

Teichmann – Pillsbury

½-½

66

Adjourned

Steinitz – Janowsky

0-1

45

 

 

Maróczy – Lee

½-½

44

 

Mason – Bird

1-0

64

 

Blackburne – Cohn

0-1

77

 

Chigorin – Tinsley

1-0

37

 

 

Lasker - Schlechter

½-½

30

 

Round 3 (June 2)

 

 

 

 

 

Lasker – Lee

1-0

39

 

 

Mason – Steinitz

0-1

50

 

Chigorin – Teichmann

1-0

28

 

 

Tinsley – Maróczy

0-1

62

 

Bird – Pillsbury

0-1

27

 

 

Cohn – Janowsky

0-1

22

 

 

Schlechter - Showalter

½-½

28

 

 

Round 4 (June 3)

 

 

 

 

 

Showalter – Lee

1-0

55

 

Janowsky – Schlechter

1-0

36

?

 

Pillsbury – Cohn

1-0

56

 

Maróczy – Bird

1-0

35

?

 

Teichmann – Tinsley

1-0

28

 

 

Steinitz - Chigorin

½-½

46

?

 

Lasker – Blackburne

0-1

46

?

 

Round 5 (June 5)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Blackburne

0-1

29

 

 

Mason – Lasker

0-1

64

 

Tinsley – Steinitz

0-1

27

 

 

Cohn – Maróczy

0-1

34

 

 

Schlechter - Pillsbury

½-½

72

 

Showalter - Janowsky

½-½

56

 

Round 6 (June 6)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Chigorin

0-1

45

 

Tinsley - Mason

½-½

26

 

 

Bird – Blackburne

0-1

59

 

Cohn – Lasker

0-1

49

 

Showalter – Steinitz

1-0

45

 

Pillsbury - Maróczy

½-½

50

 

Round 7 (June 7)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Cohn

0-1

51

 

Schlechter – Bird

1-0

60

 

 

Showalter – Tinsley

0-1

45

 

Janowsky – Chigorin

1-0

33

 

 

Pillsbury – Mason

1-0

62

 

Maróczy - Blackburne

½-½

42

 

Round 8 (June 9)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Tinsley

½-½

24

 

 

Bird – Chigorin

0-1

27

 

 

Cohn – Mason

1-0

63

 

Schlechter – Blackburne

1-0

29

 

 

Showalter – Lasker

0-1

46

 

Pillsbury – Steinitz

1-0

31

 

 

Round 9 (June 10)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Bird

½-½

42

 

 

Cohn – Tinsley

0-1

39

 

 

Schlechter – Chigorin

1-0

55

 

Showalter – Mason

0-1

32

 

Janowsky – Blackburne

1-0

47

?

 

Pillsbury – Lasker

½-½

32

 

Round 10 (June 12)

 

 

 

 

 

Steinitz – Maróczy

½-½

70

 

Lasker – Janowsky

1-0

56

 

Blackburne – Showalter

0-1

48

 

Mason – Schlechter

0-1

36

 

Chigorin – Cohn

0-1

38

 

 

Tinsley – Bird

0-1

58

 

 

Round 11 (June 13)

 

 

 

 

 

Steinitz – Lee

½-½

38

 

 

Lasker – Maróczy

½-½

30

 

 

Blackburne – Pillsbury

1-0

53

 

Mason – Janowsky

1-0

49

 

Chigorin – Showalter

1-0

32

 

 

Tinsley – Schlechter

0-1

26

 

 

Bird – Cohn

0-1

37

 

 

Round 12 (June 14)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Mason

1-0

39

 

 

Chigorin - Blackburne

½-½

49

 

Tinsley – Lasker

0-1

37

 

 

Cohn – Steinitz

0-1

33

 

 

Showalter – Maróczy

0-1

41

 

 

Janowsky – Pillsbury

1-0

47

 

Round 13 (June 16)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Schlechter

0-1

41

 

Janowsky – Bird

0-1

24

 

 

Pillsbury – Tinsley

1-0

26

 

 

Maróczy – Chigorin

0-1

33

 

 

Steinitz – Blackburne

0-1

31

 

 

Showalter – Cohn

0-1

43

 

Round 14 (June 17)

 

 

 

 

 

Janowsky – Lee

1-0

21

 

 

Pillsbury – Showalter

½-½

46

 

Maróczy – Schlechter

½-½

24

 

 

Steinitz – Bird

½-½

26

 

 

Lasker – Chigorin

1-0

49

 

Blackburne – Mason

1-0

42

 

Round 15 (June 19)

 

 

 

 

 

Lasker – Bird

1-0

38

 

 

Blackburne – Tinsley

1-0

23

 

 

Mason – Chigorin

0-1

41

 

 

Steinitz – Schlechter

0-1

39

 

Pillsbury – Lee

1-0

26

 

 

Maróczy – Janowsky

1-0

59

 

Round 16 (June 20)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Showalter

0-1

62

 

Schlechter – Janowsky

0-1

64

 

Cohn – Pillsbury

0-1

62

 

Bird - Maróczy

½-½

64

 

 

Chigorin – Steinitz

1-0

29

 

 

Blackburne – Lasker

0-1

42

 

Round 17 (June 21)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Janowsky

0-1

60

 

Showalter – Pillsbury

½-½

62

 

Schlechter – Maróczy

½-½

35

 

 

Chigorin – Lasker

0-1

42

 

Mason – Blackburne

½-½

49

 

Bird – Steinitz

0-1

44

 

 

Round 18 (June 23)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Steinitz

1-0

68

 

Pillsbury – Blackburne

0-1

41

 

Janowsky – Mason

0-1

75

 

Maróczy – Lasker

0-1

27

 

 

Showalter – Chigorin

½-½

61

 

Schlechter – Tinsley

1-0

47

 

Cohn – Bird

0-1

64

 

Round 19 (June 24)

 

 

 

 

 

Chigorin – Lee

0-1

49

 

Mason – Tinsley

1-0

35

 

 

Blackburne – Bird

1-0

39

?

 

Lasker – Cohn

½-½

29

 

 

Steinitz – Showalter

½-½

51

 

Maróczy – Pillsbury

½-½

40

 

Round 20 (June 26)

 

 

 

 

 

Mason – Lee

0-1

60

 

Blackburne – Chigorin

0-1

83

 

Lasker – Tinsley

1-0

46

 

 

Steinitz – Cohn

½-½

22

 

 

Maróczy – Showalter

½-½

55

 

Pillsbury – Janowsky

1-0

72

 

Round 21 (June 27)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Pillsbury

0-1

32

 

 

Janowsky – Maróczy

1-0

24

 

 

Bird – Lasker

0-1

58

 

 

Schlechter – Steinitz

1-0

38

 

Tinsley – Blackburne

0-1

34

 

 

Chigorin – Mason

½-½

63

 

Round 22 (June 28)

 

 

 

 

 

Blackburne – Lee

½-½

43

 

Lasker – Mason

½-½

48

 

 

Steinitz – Tinsley

1-0

21

 

 

Maróczy – Cohn

1-0

51

 

Pillsbury – Schlechter

1-0

56

 

Janowsky – Showalter

1-0

53

 

Round 23 (June 30)

 

 

 

 

 

Schlechter – Lee

1-0

38

 

Cohn – Showalter

½-½

41

 

Bird – Janowsky

0-1

30

 

 

Chigorin – Maróczy

0-1

36

 

Blackburne – Steinitz

0-1

46

 

Tinsley – Pillsbury

0-1

55

 

Round 24 (July 1)

 

 

 

 

 

Bird – Lee

0-1

56

?

 

Tinsley – Cohn

1-0

50

?

 

Chigorin – Schlechter

1-0

17

 

 

Mason – Showalter

½-½

53

 

Blackburne – Janowsky

½-½

75

 

Lasker – Pillsbury

1-0

75

 

Round 25 (July 3)

 

 

 

 

 

Tinsley – Lee

½-½

54

 

 

Chigorin – Bird

1-0

34

 

 

Mason – Cohn

0-1

77

Adjourned

Blackburne – Schlechter

½-½

37

 

Lasker – Showalter

1-0

38

 

 

Steinitz – Pillsbury

0-1

46

 

 

Round 26 (July 4)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Lasker

0-1

46

 

Steinitz – Mason

0-1

51

 

Pillsbury – Bird

½-½

65

 

Maróczy – Tinsley

1-0

33

 

 

Showalter – Schlechter

0-1

27

 

 

Janowsky – Cohn

1-0

45

 

Round 27 (July 5)

 

 

 

 

 

Steinitz – Lasker

0-1

30

 

 

Maróczy – Mason

0-1

40

 

Pillsbury – Chigorin

0-1

35

 

 

Janowsky – Tinsley

½-½

61

 

 

Showalter – Bird

1-0

65

 

Schlechter – Cohn

½-½

31

 

 

Round 28 (July 7)

 

 

 

 

 

Maróczy – Steinitz

1-0

44

 

 

Janowsky – Lasker

½-½

72

Adjourned

Showalter – Blackburne

0-1

30

 

 

Schlechter – Mason

1-0

38

 

Cohn – Chigorin

0-1

33

 

 

Bird – Tinsley

1-0

61

 

 

Round 29 (July 8)

 

 

 

 

 

Cohn – Lee

½-½

48

 

Bird - Schlechter

0-1

46

 

 

Tinsley – Showalter

0-1

48

 

Chigorin – Janowsky

0-1

28

 

 

Mason – Pillsbury

0-1

53

 

 

Blackburne – Maróczy

0-1

47

 

Round 30 (July 10)

 

 

 

 

 

Lee – Maróczy

0-1

49

 

Janowsky – Steinitz

0-1

52

 

Cohn – Blackburne

0-1

52

 

Schlechter – Lasker

0-1

22

 

 

Bird – Mason

0-1

40

 

Tinsley – Chigorin

1-0

61

 

Clarence Pretherick was the artist who drew the sketches. The photo was taken by Elliott and Fry, a Victorian photography studio in London.

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Notes:   1 The Book of the London International Chess Congress 1899 (1900), page xvi.   2 The Field, July 1, 1899.   3 Richard Teichmann retired because of illness after having played four games. His resignation was definitely announced on June 9 (The Morning Post, June 10, 1899). Teichmann lost his remaining games in the first half of tournament by forfeit (The British Chess Magazine, August 1899, page 327; The Book of the London International Chess Congress 1899 (1900), page xxiii).   4 According to The Book of the London International Chess Congress 1899 (page lii) the average number of moves per game was 45.   5 The dates of birth are taken from Chess Personalia. A Biobibliography (2005).   6 The Standard, May 31, 1899.   7 The Times, July 11, 1899.   8 The Book of the London International Chess Congress 1899 (1900), page xiii.   9 The Daily News, July 12, 1899; The Standard, July 12, 1899.   10 The Daily News, July 12, 1899; The Morning Post, July 12, 1899; The Standard, July 12, 1899.   11 All amounts are taken from the tournament book.   12 The Field, July 8, 1899. The players were also twice entertained by the City of London Chess Club (The Field, June 17, 1899; The Morning Post, July 8, 1899).   13 The Illustrated London News, May 20, 1899.

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Pictures: Playing Scenes of the London International Tournament 1899 (Black and White, June 24, 1899); James Mason (The Hastings Chess Tournament Book, 1896); Harry N. Pillsbury (The Hastings Chess Tournament Book, 1896); Some of the Competitors in the London International Tournament (Black and White, July 15, 1899).

 © April 2015 Joost van Winsen. All Rights Reserved


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